Monday, August 24, 2009

Beach closings due to stormwater pollution

The sign says:

"This area is subject to bacterial contamination after rainstorms. All bathers and surfers are advised to stay out of the area after rainstorms due to potential health risks.
This area is permanently closed to shellfish harvesting"

Did you know that stormwater pollution was the major cause for 20,000 US beach closing days in 2008?

Find out about your beach in the recently published "Testing the Waters" - the NRDC report that details the beach closures in 2008.
Report is in PDF format.

Friday, August 21, 2009

Homes pollute 50% more than previously thought

This was an interesting article. Findings of a recent study investigating water pollution generated at home were published today on Eurekalert.org. Results of the study show pollution levels to be at least 50% higher than previously thought. Here is a link to the actual article, and reprinted below:


Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Homes pollute: Linked to 50 percent more water pollution than previously believed

IMAGE: Polluted runoff originates from several sources, and has been linked to fish kills and a loss of aquatic species diversity. A new study suggests current runoff models may underestimate pollution...

Click here for more information.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 19, 2009 — They say there's no place like home. But scientists are reporting some unsettling news about homes in the residential areas of California. The typical house there — and probably elsewhere in the country — is an alarming and probably underestimated source of water pollution, according to a new study reported today at the 238th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society.

In the study, Lorence Oki, Darren Haver and colleagues explain that runoff results from rainfall and watering of lawns and gardens, which winds up in municipal storm drains. The runoff washes fertilizers, pesticides and other contaminants into storm drains, and they eventually appear in rivers, lakes and other bodies of water.

"Results from our sampling and monitoring study revealed high detection frequencies of pollutants such as pesticides and pathogen indicators at all sites," Oki says of their study of eight residential areas in Sacramento and Orange Counties in California.

Preliminary results of the study suggest that current models may underestimate the amount of pollution contributed by homes by up to 50 percent. That's because past estimates focused on rain-based runoff during the wet season. "Use of pesticides, however, increases noticeably during the dry season due to gardening, and our data contains greater resolution than previous studies," Oki says.

Pollutants detected in outdoor runoff included ant-control pesticide products. Previous surveys have shown that the majority of pesticides purchased by homeowners are used to control ants. To encourage pollutant reduction, the researchers initiated community outreach programs centered on improving both irrigation control and pest management.



Wednesday, August 19, 2009

SPCC compliance made easy


Isn't this cool?

We showed our client this catch basin insert and he immediately wanted this for his work site. This stainless steel, custom unit installed in about 20-30 minutes and was instantly ready to work. He can now open or close his drain without removing the grate. The yellow pillow is a replaceable hydrocarbon absorbent pillow.

Monday, August 17, 2009

Invasive Plants Banned in CT

I go to a lot of environmental shows and was just going through some old documents today and found this list of plants that are banned in CT. I just copied the list that was typed up and thought I would post it. Also helpful, the link on the CT DEP site detailing invasive aquatic plants in CT.

Below is the copy of the list of banned invasives:

Plants Banned in Connecticut
By Public Act 04-203


As of October 1, 2004, no person shall import, move (except for the purposes of eradication), sell, purchase, transplant, cultivate or distribute any of the following invasive plants:

1

Curly leaved pondweed
(Potamogeton crispus)

23

Perennial pepperweed
(Lepidium latifolium)

2

Fanwort (Cabomba Caroliniana)

24

Japanese Knotweed
(Polygonum cuspidatum)

3

Eurasian Water Milfoil

(Myriophyllum Heterophyllum)

25

Mile-a-Minute vine

(polygonum Perfoliatum)

4

Variable Water Milfoil

(Myriophyllum Heterophyllum)

26

Fig Buttercup (Ranunculus Ficaria)

5

Water Chestnut (Trapa Natans)

27

Coltsfoot (Tussilago Farfara)

6

Egeria (Egeria Densa)

28

Japanese Stilt Grass (Microstegium Vimineum)

7

Hydrilla (Hydrilla Verticillata)

29

Common Reed (Phragmites Australis)

8

Common Barberry (Berberis Vulgaris)

30

Sycamore Maple (Acer Pseudoplatanus)

9

Autumn Olive (Elaeagnus Umbellata)

31

Princess Tree (Paulownia Tomentosa)

10

Bell's Honeysuckle (Lonicera Xbella)

32

White Poplar (Populus Alba)

11

Amur Honeysuckle (lonicera Maackii)

33

False Indigo (amorpha fruticosa)

12

Morrow's Honeysuckle (Lonicera Morrowii)

34

Russian Olive (Eleagnus Angustifolia)

13

Common Buckthorn (Thamnus Cathartica)

35

Wineberry (Rubus Phoenicolasius)

14

Multiflora Rose (Rosa Multiflora)

36

Kudzu (Pueraria Montana)

15

Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus Orbiculatus)

37

Canada Thistle (Cirsium Arvense)

16

Garlic Mustard (Alliaria Petiolata)

38

Jimonsweed (Datura Stramonium)

17

Narrowleaf Bittercress

39

Crested Late-summer mint (Elsholtzia Ciliata)

18

Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea Biebersteinii)

40

Cypress Spurge (Euphorbia Cyparissias)

19

Black Swallow-Wort

(Cynanchum Louiseae)

41

Slender Snake Cotton (Froelichia Gracilis)

20

Pale Swallow-wort (Cynanchum Rossicum)

42

Ground Ivy (Glechoma Hederacea)

21

Leafy Spurge (Euphorbia Esula)

43

Giant Hogweed (heracleuym Mantegazzianum)

22

Dame's Rocket (Hesperis Matronalis)

44

Japanese Hops (Humulus Japonicus)

45

Ornamental Jewelweed (Impatiens Glanulifera)

54

Bittersweet Nightshade (Solanum Dulcamara)

46

Common Kochia (Kochia Scoparia)

55

Garden Heliotrope (Valeriana Officinalis)

47

Ragged Robin (Lychnis Floscuculi)

56

Hairy Jointgrass (Artharaxon Hispidus)

48

Scotch Thistle (Onopordum Acanthium)

57

Drooping Brome-Grass (Bromus Tectorum)

49

Bristle Knotweed (Polygonum Caespitosum)

58

Japanese Sedge (Carex Kobomugi)

50

Giant Knotweed (polygonum Sachalinense)

59

Reed Managrass (Glyceria Maxima)

51

Sheep Sorrel (Rumex Acetosella)

60

Canada Bluegrass (Poa Compressa)

52

Ragwort (Senecio Jacobaea)

61

Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus Altissima)

53

Cup Plant (Silphium Perfoliatum)



As of October 1, 2005, no person shall import, move, sell, purchase, transplant, cultivate or distribute any of the following invasive plants:

1

Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum Salicaria)

11

Yellow Floating Heart

2

Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis Scorpiodes)

12

Onerow Yellowcress (Rorippa Microphylla)

3

Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera Japonica)

13

Watercress (Rorippa Nasturtium-aquaticum) except for watercress sold for human consumption without its reproductive structure;

4

Goutweed (Aegopodium Podagraia)

14

Giant Salvinia (Salvinia Molesta)

5

Flowering Rush (Butomus Umbellatus)

15

Yellow Iris (Iris Pseudacorus)

6

Pond Water Starwort (Callitriche Stagnalis)

16

Water Lettuce (Pistia Stratiotes)

7

European Waterclover (Marsilea Quadrifolia)

17

Border Privet (Ligustrum Obtusifoliuim)

8

Parrotfeather (myriophyllum aquaticum)

18

Tatarian Honeysuckle (Lonicera Tatarica)

9

Brittle Water-nymph (Najas Minor)

19

Dwarf Honeysuckle (Lonicera Xylosteum)

10

American Water Lotus (Nelumbo Lutea)

20

Gargen Loosetrife (Lysimachia Vulgaris)


Sunday, August 9, 2009

Croton Reservoir


We went yesterday to the Croton Reservoir - what a great place to see.

I took some amazing pictures on the most beautiful day in the summer.

I also checked out Croton Point Park - GREAT!!!

Kudos to team Westchester County Parks!!! Thank you!